At Play With National Geographic’s YOUR SHOT

YOUR SHOT On National Geographic

by Carl Kruse

UPDATE:  7 November 2019:

As of 31 October 2019, National Geographic has sadly closed the YOUR SHOT section of its site.   This post remains for historical reasons.  There are fortunately many other sites online to share images. We recommend FSTOPPERS and 500px.  Both sites have high quality contributors and good editors.  We give perhaps the nod to Fstoppers, which also has excellent tutorials, articles, reviews and top notch community discussion rooms.  That is where I am active.   If  you check out the site, stop by and say hello.  You can find me at Carl Kruse on Fstoppers.  Keep doing good art and being kind to each other.

Carl Kruse

ORIGINAL POST:

Among the many sites to share images online — Instagram, 500px, Pinterest, Fstoppers, Snapchat – one of the best is National Geographic’s “Your Shot,” a place where amateurs and professionals gather. A feast for the eyes and often, soul.

Some of what happens on “Your Shot” finds its way to the fabled pages of National Geographic, making YOUR SHOT a catapult for aspiring artists vying for the attention of a larger stage.

Of special interest is the “Daily Dozen” where magazine editors select their 12 favorite images from the thousands uploaded daily. Most of these are  fantastic voyages in of themselves, a respite from the travails of daily life. Much goodness there.

For fun I’ve taken to posting some of my own iPhone images to strut  along the Canon 5D and Nikon 4DS images of the world-class. While superior cameras make it easier to create beautiful images, it is ultimately technique and the artistic eye that make way for magic on YOUR SHOT, so even those with lowly smartphones have a chance to run for the money.

Examples of iphone photos I have posted on “Your Shot” include:

Carl Kruse NYE Miami

Street Art Berlin, Germany

carl kruse meki image

More Street Art in Berlin, Germany

Others include:

http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/10142571/

http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/9974413/

http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/10001003/

(All photos copyright:  Carl Kruse).

Surely, you can do as well, probably better.

Photographers retain full copyright of their photos, so all cool for those worried the big bad magazine will abscond with your work.  By the way, all images on this site are (natch) copyright Carl Kruse.

Check out what’s happening, and if you do, say hello.

On YOUR SHOT I’m at

http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/profile/1247970/

My National Geographic profile is

https://membercenter.nationalgeographic.com/108927222984/

Keep doing goodness.

Carl Kruse

Reach out to me by email:      info AT carlkruse DOT net.

P.S. For another wonderful photographer, check out my earlier post on Jack Delano:  Carl Kruse Talks About Jack Delano.

P.P.S.  For my other blog check out the Carl Kruse Blog.

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Jack Delano- Experiments in Light Photography

Some time in the early 1990s I came across Jack Delano’s work in a photography book titled “Puerto Rico Mio: Four Decades of Change.” Here Mr. Delano compared images from his first visit to the island in the 1940s with those he later made of the same sites 40 years later.  Delano had first traveled to Puerto Rico in 1941 while working for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and in 1946, after his service with the U.S Army Air Forces, he returned, having received a Guggenheim Fellowship to photograph the island.

Coming of age in the 1970s-early 1980s in Puerto Rico as I did,  was to witness socioeconomic changes that saw my grandmother raised in a shack yet found me in a first-world college prep school with eyes set on the Ivy League. Delano’s images are stirring and magnificent, capturing a people and place in deep flux.  I highly recommend his photo book on Puerto Rico  if you can find it.

Delving further into his work I noticed he had experimented with light photography  / light painting with long exposure shots using mostly natural light for effect.  Many of these images are well known but they were a surprising treat for me.

kruse-delano“Chicago Railyards,” Jack Delano, 1942

carlkruse-delano

“Chicago Union Station,” Jack Delano, 1943

Carl Kruse uses both images from the public domain — photographs from the U.S. Farm Security Admin., which employed Jack Delano in the early 1940s.

I invite everyone to learn more about Jack Delano, a photographer of his time, and beyond.

Carl Kruse

Contact:  info AT carlkruse DOT net