Frida Kahlo: Flowers Are Born From Mud

by Asia Leonardi On 6 July 1907 in Mexico City, Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderon was born to German parents who emigrated from Hungary. She claimed to be born in 1910, with the Revolution, with a new Mexico. Frida Kahlo is a revolution. An artistic revolution, a revolution of thought, an overwhelming hymn to … Continue reading “Frida Kahlo: Flowers Are Born From Mud”

Are Memes Art?

by Vittorio Compagno The digital era gave birth to unique trends tied to the advent of the Internet. The source of many of these trends is as old as the internet itself, which is to say online forums. From these fountains of discussion, as in the ancient Greek “agorà,” emerged all sorts of culture and … Continue reading “Are Memes Art?”

Thinking About Realism

by Fraser Hibbitt Realism tells tales like any other genre, and it is odd that we should be forced through much digression knowing that point. What I mean when I say Realism is the specific genre of fiction that wishes to imitate contemporary life in a ‘realistic’ manner. Realism has come to possess a high-standing … Continue reading “Thinking About Realism”

Movements of the Soul Translated into Ceramic: Manon de Vlieger

Interview by Asia Leonardi Amsterdam is the motherland of artists. Among its streets, its bridges, and its canals, a century-old history reverberates, interwoven on the concepts of tolerance, resistance to authoritarian domains, spontaneous expression, freedom. It is for this reason that this city offers a combination of the most sophisticated creative emergencies and the most … Continue reading “Movements of the Soul Translated into Ceramic: Manon de Vlieger”

World of WearableArt: Blurring Boundaries in The Art World

by Hazel Anna Rogers There is often a perceived disparity between the words “fashion” and “art.” Many people fall at the feet of, say, a Gauguin, a Turner, or a Matisse, but upon hearing the word “fashion” quickly recede into their boots, or worse, scorn and sneer its name. I understand (I think) where they … Continue reading “World of WearableArt: Blurring Boundaries in The Art World”

Museum of Old and New Art

by Fraser Hibbitt Photos from MONA, Carl Kruse and Blooloop In 2006 the Moorilla Museum of Antiquities closed for a huge revamping and after the input of $75 million and five years of construction the Museum of Old and New Art emerged (MONA). Located in Holbart, Tasmania, the museum has since conversed with the world … Continue reading “Museum of Old and New Art”

Simonetta Vespucci: Venus of the Renaissance

By Asia Leonardi In the church of Florence of San Salvatore Ognissanti, where the secular exponents of her family are exhibited, rests today the beautiful Simonetta Vespucci in her secular sleep. But there was a time when the prodigious beauty was the inspiring muse of major Renaissance artists, such as Piero Cosimo, Verrocchio, Filippo Lippi, … Continue reading “Simonetta Vespucci: Venus of the Renaissance”

Charlotte Salomon, the Painter Killed in Auschwitz between Life and Theater

By Asia Leonardi Charlotte Salomon, a Berlin Jewish artist, was one of the most original and pioneering female painters of the 1900s. Her work “Life? or Theater? ” condenses her artistic career: some eight hundred compositions that trace her artistic life; an innovative style that we could compare to the contemporary graphic novel in which … Continue reading “Charlotte Salomon, the Painter Killed in Auschwitz between Life and Theater”

Van Gogh’s Chair: Omens of Tragedy

By Hazel Anna Rogers I first saw Vincent Van Gogh’s painting ‘Van Gogh’s Chair’ (1888) in secondary school, in the middle of an art class. My art teacher had no particular regard for art history. She found it uninteresting, and it was never a fundamental part of the classes she taught. She was a tiny … Continue reading “Van Gogh’s Chair: Omens of Tragedy”

Activist Art – Art as Protest

by Rosie Lesso Art and politics have a closely intertwined relationship going back millennia. But it is only in the past 100 years that artists have embraced art as a form of political protest, one that can educate, inspire or instigate change. Known as ‘activist art’ or ‘protest art,’ this fusion of art and activism … Continue reading “Activist Art – Art as Protest”